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Salad onions are generally the thinning crop of sweet yellow varieties including Walla Walla Sweet, Vidalia, Maui Sweet, Texas SpringSweet and Texas 1015 SuperSweet. They will usually will be white in-store because they are picked young with their tops intact like a very large green onion.

Scientific Binomial Name:

SELECTION INFORMATION
Usage

Raw in salads, barbecued on shish kebabs or grilled whole or sliced length-wise. Also use in stews and soups, on sandwiches, hamburgers and in meat dishes.

Selection

Good-quality salad onions will be firm, free of blemishes or mold spots and healthy fresh looking greens all the way to the tips.

Some feel that sweeter onions will be flat-shaped from stem to root-end, not round.

Avoid

Avoid product that is soft, wet-skinned, bruised, has dark blemishes or spots of mold.

Storage

Salad onions should be stored in the refrigerator and washed only just prior to use.

Sweet onions are thin-skinned, juicy and are therefore very fragile and do not keep as long as regular onions.

Ripening

In general, vegetables will not ripen further after harvest.

  • Nutritional Information
  • Tips & Trivia
  • Keep onions and potatoes away from fluorescent lighting, which turns them green.

    To avoid teary eyes, peel onions under cold water. Water washes away volatile sulfur that causes teary eyes. Those who wear contacts tend not to be affected as much when cutting onions.

    Salad onions are generally the thinning crop of sweet yellow varieties including Walla Walla Sweet, Vidalia, Maui Sweet, Texas SpringSweet and Texas 1015 SuperSweet. They will usually will be white in-store because they are picked young with their tops intact like a very large green onion.

    The first Walla Walla onions were grown by Peter Pieri in the late 1800's. Many people mistakenly believe that Walla Walla onions are white. While they are white when immature, this confusion comes from misleading labeling. True "Walla Walla Sweets" are a specific variety of yellow sweet onion grown in Walla Walla Washington.

    The name onion comes from the Latin, "unio" via the French "oignon" and the English "unyun." The onion plant belongs to the Allium family - the same as the narcissus (daffodils).

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