Image of Oyster Mushrooms

Also known as Tree Oyster Mushroom, Grey Oyster Mushroom, Oyster Shelf, Hiratake ("Flat Mushroom" in Japanese), Tree Oyster, Straw Mushroom and Tamogitake mushroom.

Scientific Binomial Name: Pleurotus ostreatus

SELECTION INFORMATION
Usage

Cooking with meats, omelets and stews. Used often in Japanese, Chinese, and Korean cuisine.

Selection

Good-quality Oyster mushrooms will vary in color from white through to gray-brown, be dry and have smooth, firm caps with firm plump white stems.

Avoid

product that is wet, dark-brown, bruised or has spots of mold.

Storage

To store mushrooms, keep them unwashed, dry, cool and dark.

Store mushrooms in a brown paper bag, or in a Tupperware type container on a paper towel in the refrigerator. Do not store mushrooms in plastic bags!

Ripening

Mushrooms will not ripen further after picking - they will only deteriorate, so use as soon as possible.

  • Nutritional Information
  • Oyster Mushrooms are low in sodium, and very low in saturated fat and cholesterol. They're also a good source of Protein, Thiamin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Iron, Magnesium, Zinc and Manganese, and a great source of Dietary Fiber, Riboflavin, Niacin, Pantotheni

  • Tips & Trivia
  • To store mushrooms, keep them unwashed, dry, cool and dark.

    Store mushrooms in a brown paper bag, or in a Tupperware type container on a paper towel in the refrigerator. Do not store mushrooms in plastic bags!

    To clean mushrooms, wipe them with a damp cloth or soft vegetable brush. Because of their porous nature, mushrooms should not be washed in water, as they will absorb water like a sponge, losing nutrients, flavor and changing texture.

    Three thousand years ago, mushrooms were a delicacy of the Pharaohs in Egypt, who considered them too delicate for common people to eat. They were favored in ancient Rome as a "food of the gods."

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