Image of Rosemary

This popular herb has a spicy, strong fragrance - excellent for beef, pork, lamb, poultry & seafood, along with many vegetables. Rosemary has long been considered a symbol of remembrance and fidelity.

Scientific Binomial Name: Rosemarinus officinalis

SELECTION INFORMATION
Usage

Beef, pork, lamb, veal, poultry & seafood dishes and with many vegetables.

Selection

In general, herbs should be fresh looking, crisp and brightly-colored.

Avoid

Avoid herbs that are wilted, have dry brown areas, or are pale or yellow in color. Slimy looking dark spots with small areas of mold indicate old product or poor handling.

Storage

Most herbs benefit from being stored with freshly cut stems in a glass of water - either in or out of the refrigerator.

Ripening

Herbs will not ripen further after harvest.

  • Nutritional Information
  • Rosemary is low in Sodium, and very low in Cholesterol. It's also a good source of Vitamin B6, Magnesium, Potassium and Copper, and a great source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Folate, Calcium, Iron and Manganese.

    1 tsp

    Amount per serving

    Calories :331Calories from Fat :
    Total Fat15.22
    Cholesterol0%
    Sodium 50%
    Total Carbohydrate64.06%
    Dietary Fiber42.6%
    Sugars 0%
    Protein 4.88%
    Vitamin A3128%
    Vitamin C61.2%
    Calcium 1280 %
    Iron 29.25%

  • Tips & Trivia
  • Rosemary is native to the Mediterranean region and is a member of the mint family Lamiaceae.

    Rosemary gets its name from the Latin word rosmarinus, which is derived from "dew" (ros) and "sea" (marinus), or "dew of the sea".

    This herb has always been considered a symbol of remembrance and fidelity. At one time it was traditional for bridesmaids to present the groom with a bunch of rosemary on the morning of the wedding. The English were wary of such uses, wary of another superstition to the effect that where rosemary flourishes, the woman rules.

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