Image of Kaffir Lime Leaves

Kaffir Lime leaf is a necessity for Thai dishes with a strong flavor & scent of limes. Lime leaves usually come in a pack or container of multiple leaves, while recipes only call for a few. Usage for lime leaves is varied and memorable - often defining dishes like Tom Ka Gai.

Scientific Binomial Name:

SELECTION INFORMATION
Usage

In dishes like "Tom Ka Gai", and many others, lime leaves provide a flavor of lime zest with a kick!

These leaves are commonly juiced to provide an exceptional flavor.

Selection

Chose shiny firm, medium to dark green, double leafs (one leaf connected to another), practically spot or blemish free. The aroma when roughed up in your hands should instantly tell you that you have the right item.

Avoid

Avoid rusty single leaves that are dried out or cracked. Also look for leaves to be stuck together and slimy, or even just wet as these leaves are either on their way to decaying or are already there.

Storage

Lime leaves will hold up in your fridge for a week or more, but most dishes only call for 4-8 leaves, and they are often packed with 30 plus, so put them in the freezer where they will remain in great shape indefinitely.

Ripening

Herbs will not ripen further after harvest.

  • Nutritional Information
  • Tips & Trivia
  • The beauty of these hearty leaves is that they are perfect for your freezer and your wallet. Not only do these leaves hold of to freezing conditions well they also retain their flavor and smell as if completely fresh.

    Kaffir Lime leaves are unique because each leaf resembles two leaves joined together with the lower leaf oval in shape and the top leaf somewhat heart shaped.

    The Kaffir Lime's species name "hystrix" comes from the Greek word for porcupine.

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